Common Misconception about Tree Pruning

There are a lot of common misconceptions about tree pruning.  And it is one of the things that a lot of people think that any person can perform with just simple pruning tools.  And most of the times, this useful maintenance process is misunderstood as a result of the common misconceptions that cloud its true value and the proper way to do it. What a lot of people fail to realize is that proper tree pruning will surely boost the health of a tree, its appearance and value. The following are some of the usual misconceptions about tree pruning that you need to know about.

  1. Trees will grow perfectly well without pruning . This is true for woodland trees because they thrive with nature’s own pruning methods. However, the trees that grow in your backyard have different needs.  Suburban trees need pruning in order for them to remove rapid-growing water sprouts and maintain their shape.   In addition, it helps boost the general health of the tree by removing the dead and damaged branches, improves branch framework, lowers hazards such as falling limbs and low hanging branches. It also helps increase the size and yield of many fruit bearing trees.
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    Tree Pruning Perth

  2. Cut near to the trunk to help trees repair their damaged tissues. Unlike human wounds, trees can’t repair broken or lost tissues. Instead of repairing the damage, they develop fresh wood layers to conceal their injuries. Contrary to popular belief, avoid trimming near the trunk of the tree or its major limb to prevent damaging the collar branch and causing even greater wound and damage.
  3. Freshly pruned parts of a tree can be painted with tar, varnish or paint. Some people think these chemicals keep the fungi and bacteria away. But the truth is no matter how hard you try, it is very difficult to keep bad microorganisms away from a new cut. Adding these types of chemical wound dressing would actually make things worse. If you need to prune, you need to make yourself aware of the correct pruning technique that is appropriate for the type of tree you have in your yard.
  4. Root loss is usually compensated by cutting the tree’s crown. When transplanting a tree, it is normal that a tree would lose some parts of its roots. In order to help the tree recover from this root loss, some people opt to prune the crown of the tree. On the contrary, pruning should be avoided after transplantation, most especially if you’re working with younger trees. And a couple of years after transplanting the tree, pruning should be kept at a minimum rate.

If you need more expert tree pruning advice, simply visit the WA Treeworks website at http://watreeworks.com.au/

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